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Sermon given by Father James (Bohlman)

On Myrrhbearing Women Sunday

April 30th, 2017

At St. Mary Magdalene Church

Rincon, GA

(and for the missions in Helena, GA & Big Island, HI)

 


Acts 6: 1-7

Mark 15: 43-16:8

 


In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

 


Christ is Risen!

 


One Friday afternoon, Fred… being Fred…left work but instead of going home, he stayed out the entire weekend fishing with Leroy. When he finally appeared at home on Sunday night, Lucinda was not happy. “WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?!” she screamed, and without waiting for a response continued yelling: “I had no idea if you were dead! I was worried sick! You are so inconsiderate!” And it went on that way for about 2 hours. Finally, Lucinda stopped, took a breath and asked, “How would you like it if you didn’t see me for 2 or 3 days?!" To which question Fred unwisely replied, "That would be fine with me!” Well, Monday went by and Fred didn’t see Lucinda. Tuesday and Wednesday came and went with the same results. Finally, on Thursday, the swelling went down just enough that he could see her.

 


Lucinda, in full umbrage, can be a terrifying experience, as Fred has repeatedly found out. There are things in Life which terrify us as well. Fear, in fact, is the basic theme of this third Sunday of the Paschal season, the Sunday called the Sunday of the Myrrhbearing Women. This title refers to the women who went to that tomb where Jesus lay to perform their last service of love for him, to anoint his body. One of the women in this group was “our” Mary of Magdala… St. Mary Magdalene. When the women arrived at the tomb they were greeted by an angel with these words: “You seek Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He is risen! He is not here.” St. Mark describes how, when the women heard this message, and saw his empty tomb, they turned and ran, “for they were afraid”.

 


Now that Great Lent of 2017 is over, are we glad to meet Jesus, or are we also afraid… afraid that he is going to get started on that repentance business again, afraid that he will keep harping on our need to still keep changing?! Or do we assume that now that we are celebrating Pascha we no longer have to think about the change that repentance calls for? After all, Great Lent is over. Right?

 


So, given that the Myrrhbearing Women loved Jesus, why were they afraid? They were afraid because they had seen him dead and if he really was now alive, then how could they ever trust their senses again? Would the world continue spinning according to the old rules, or was something new afoot? The possibility that something new and unknown was going on terrified them… so they turned and ran.

 


Some time ago "Reader’s Digest" told the story about a company which mailed out some special advertising business post cards with a mustard seed glued to it with the following caption that said: "If you have faith in our product as small as this mustard seed, you are guaranteed to get excellent results and to be totally satisfied. Signed, The Management.” A few months later one recipient of this promotional piece wrote back to the company and said, "You will be very interested to know that I planted the mustard seed which you sent on your advertising card: The BEST tomatoes I have ever grown!”

 


Like the company which sent the seed, sometimes we aren’t doing what we think we are doing! One of those things is how we think about God. Why do we continue to insist that God play by our rules, thinking that now that Great Lent is over… why can’t he just leave us alone and quit with this repentance business?! After all, Great Lent… the season of repentance… is over. Right ? Is it not possible that this attitude itself is what needs to change, Lent or no Lent?! Is it not possible that even while we are now celebrating Pascha… the celebration of new life… that we have unconsciously returned to our old life: Our old way of thinking and seeing, our same old way of living and reacting? If so, then what do we do with Christ’s command that we also become new? Do we ignore that demand? Or do we, like the Myrrhbearing Women this morning, also run away?

 


At the end of their first date, Fred took Lucinda back to her home. Emboldened by the night, he decided to try for that important first kiss. With an air of confidence, he leaned with his hand up against the wall and, smiling, he said to her, "Lucinda, darling, how about a good night kiss?" Embarrassed, Lucinda replied, "Oh, I couldn’t do that. My parents might see us!" Persisting, Fred said, "Oh come on! Who’s going see us at this hour?" Well, this line of reasoning went on for about 10 minutes until the porch light snapped on and Lucinda’s youngest sister Trixie stood there in her pajamas, her hair all disheveled. In a sleepy voice Trixie said, "Dad says to go ahead and give him a kiss. But for crying out loud tell him to take his hand off the intercom button so we can all sleep!"

 


Do we know what we are doing? Are we honest with ourselves when questions occur to us about ourselves, beginning with the question: When we feel fear, what do we do? Do we react as this morning’s Gospel says of the Myrrhbearing women, that they “Fled from the tomb… And they said nothing to anyone, for they were afraid.” Running away was their first impulse, but later, the realization that Jesus lives overcame their fear and replaced it with the courage of joy. Is it that way for us here this morning? Has our Paschal celebration replaced our old way of living with a new courage to be different than we have been up until now? Or is this whole topic of changing simply a Lenten thing and not relevant to our life on this post-Pascha morning? After all, it’s not Great Lent anymore. Right ?

 


The question for us on this third Sunday of the Paschal period is: Have we automatically gone back to leaving Jesus’ call to change out of our everyday thinking and living? Do we still continue to run from what frightens us or to rage at what frustrates us, as we have done all of our life? Just because we went through Great Lent and have arrived at Pascha, does this mean that we are now changed for the better? Is the changing over? Or are we, like this morning’s Myrrhbearing women, still running from the new life that has come forth from the tomb of this past Great Lent?

 

 

 

Christ is Risen!

 


Sermon given by Father James (Bohlman)

On Thomas Sunday

April 23rd, 2017

At St. Mary Magdalene Church

(and for the missions in Helena, GA & Big Island, HI)

 


Acts 5: 12-20

John 20: 19-31

 


In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

 


Christ is Risen!

 


According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, while both male and female reindeer grow antlers in the summer each year, male reindeer drop their antlers at the beginning of winter, usually late November to mid-December. Female reindeer retain their antlers until after they give birth in the spring. Therefore, according to every historical rendition depicting Santa’s reindeer, every single one of them, from Rudolph to Blitzen, had to be a girl! We should’ve known: Only women, while pregnant, would be able to drag a fat man in a red velvet suit all around the world in one night… and not get lost!

 


When we get lost in our doubts, what do we do? Do we simply stop believing? Or do we forge ahead, awaiting the day when things will become clear to us? Even though we may fake it when around others, all of us… at one time or another… have sometimes felt that Life is filled with things that we simply don’t understand. For most of us, we almost automatically know the difference between not understanding something, and not believing in something. When it comes to our Faith, however, we seem to think that wondering about something means that we are doubting: I am here this morning to tell you that they are not the same thing! Doubts are our way of reaching out to eventually understand something! We often automatically think that “doubt” is a bad thing, that it is a sign that we do not believe… but doubt can have another function in our life, and that is that doubt can cause us to seek out an answer that does not readily occur to us! Doubt can actually cause us to stretch our minds and give rise to new beginnings as we struggle to understand what doesn’t immediately make sense to us. Some people seem to have no doubts and just charge ahead through life; the majority of us, however, have to wrestle with doubts, which we sometimes take to mean that we lack faith. This morning’s Gospel reading makes the point that doubts do not exclude faith, and that having faith does not eliminate doubts.

 


This morning we commemorate the Apostle Thomas and his faith in Jesus Christ. Even though the Apostle Thomas of this morning’s Gospel reading has been branded “Doubting Thomas”, still… as is evidenced by his immediate declaration of Christ as “My Lord and my God”… Thomas, too, despite doubts, expressed his deep and primary faith in Jesus Christ. As this morning’s Gospel passage makes clear: Sometimes faith grows out of our doubts.

 


A Vermont native by the name of Ronald Demuth, while touring the Eagle’s Rock African Safari Zoo with a group of people from St. Petersburg, Russia… for reasons known only to Mr. Demuth, decided to show the Russian group an American wonder: Crazy Glue. Wanting to demonstrate just how good the adhesive was, he covered the palms of his hands with the adhesive and then jokingly placed them on the rear end of a passing rhino… again, for reasons known only to Mr. Demuth. Sally The Rhino, a resident of the zoo for the past thirteen years, was not initially startled as she had been part of the petting exhibit since her arrival as a baby. However, once she became aware of being involuntarily stuck to Mr. Demuth, she panicked and ran amok in the petting area, making Mr. Demuth an unintended passenger. During Sally’s tirade two fences were destroyed, a shed wall was gored, and a number of small animals escaped. Unfortunately, during the stampede, three pygmy goats and one duck were stomped to death. As for Mr. Demuth, it took a team of medics and zoo caretakers’ to sedate Sally and then, using a solvent, to remove his hands from her buttocks. Mr. Demuth is now under a life-long ban from ever setting foot again in The Eagle’s Rock African Safari Zoo.

 

What do we do when we are startled by our doubts? Do we panic and throw our Faith out with the bath? Or do continue with our everyday routines hoping that some kind of clarity will arise out of our doubt? As we age we can sometimes come to feel less sure of the ready answers that we had when we were so much younger. And yet, despite what does not make sense to us, we still have to go on: Meals need to be cooked, bills need to be paid, and children need to be raised. Just because we might have doubts does not mean that life comes to a halt, and the same is true of faith: Just because doubt occurs does not mean that we have stopped believing. Just because we can’t see the air we don’t stop breathing; in the same way, just because we can’t understand does not mean that we stop believing! Believing is not the result of a preponderance of evidence, and Faith does not mean certitude; in fact faith is actually the willingness to believeand to go on in spite of our doubts. Last week, on Holy Friday, we heard even Jesus Christ express doubt when he cried out: “Lord, why have you forsaken me!”And then, right after his doubt, was his faith: “Thy will be done.” The fact is that doubts are simply a part of life… even for Jesus Christ

 


A joke has made the rounds about Joseph of Arimathea who was a very wealthy Pharisee, a member of the council, and a secret follower of Jesus. It was Joseph who went to Pilate and asked for Jesus’ body after the crucifixion. And it was Joseph who supplied the tomb for Jesus’ burial. Well, it seems that someone pulled Joseph aside and said, "Joseph, that was such a beautiful, costly, hand-hewn tomb. Why on earth did you give it to someone else to be buried in?" Joseph’s response? He just smiled and replied: "Why not? He only needed it for the weekend."

 


Now that we know how the story ended it is easy for us to see the humor in this interchange… unlike the confusion that we can feel when doubts arise. Many of us, even at our advanced age, can still find ourselves perplexed by some of the things that Life throws at us, and at a loss for an answer. When Christ holds out his hands to Thomas in this morning’s Gospel, he holds them out to us as well asking: “Who do you say that I am?” What answer do we give to this question? It is a scary thing to stare at those crucified hands, those hands that for some symbolize complete failure and loss… and to yet say, “My Lord and my God”. The scariness, however, does not makes our declaration any the less true. This is faith: To place our lives in Christ’s nail-imprinted hands, despite our worries and our doubts, trusting him to bring goodness out of life’s difficulties and out of our confusion and uncertainties.

 


When we doubt, we are often so sure that we have come to the right conclusion. Has it ever occurred to us that maybe we simply don’t understand as much as we think we do?! Has it ever occurred to us that maybe we need to live a bit longer in order to understand more? Has it ever occurred to us that our doubts might arise not out of a lack of faith, but simply out of what we don’t yet understand?! Let us not be frightened by our moments of doubt. Life does not come to a halt while we have doubts about things, and neither should our relationship with God. Even in the midst of doubt, we should still talk to God, trusting that his love for us is stronger and larger than our confusion.

 


We Orthodox seem to always be on a journey: No sooner do we celebrate God’s birth in the flesh then we set off for the Jordon and then into the desert of Great Lent. No sooner do we end our Lenten journey by arriving at the Tomb then we set off on a journey towards Pentecost and the coming of the Holy Spirit. As we journey towards Pentecost of 2017, let us ask the Holy Spirit to come and enable our doubts to become the fuel for an even more mature faith!

 


Christ is Risen!

 


Sermon given by Father James (Bohlman)

On Palm Sunday

April 9th, 2017

At St. Mary Magdalene Church

Rincon, GA

(and for the missions in Helena, GA & Big Island, HI)

 


Phil. 4:4-9

John 12: 1-18

 


In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

 


Glory to Jesus Christ!

 


The following is a letter sent in years ago to the “Dear Abby” column:

 


“Dear Abby, I have been so blessed in my life. Great parents, great wife and kids, great job, and a great education. When I finally retired, I could hardly wait to spend time enjoying my favorite pastime, which is bass fishing. I got my own little fishing boat and tried to get my wife to join me, but she just doesn’t like fishing, saying “It’s just a waste of time!” Finally, one day at the Bait & Tackle Shop, I got to talking to Sam, the shop owner, who it turns out loves bass fishing as much as I do. We quickly became fishing buddies. As I said, the wife doesn't care about fishing; she not only refuses to join us, she always complains that I spend too much time fishing. A few weeks ago Sam and I had the best fishing trip ever. Not only did I catch the most beautiful bass you've ever seen, only a few minutes later Sam must have caught his twin brother! So I took a picture of Sam holding up the two nice bass that we caught and showed the picture to the wife, hoping that maybe she'd get interested. Instead, she says she doesn't want me to go fishing at all anymore! And she wants me to sell the boat! What would you do? Sincerely, A Fisherman.”

 


Dear Abby’s reply was priceless: “Dear Fisherman: Instead of giving up fishing or selling the boat, there is a third option… Get rid of that narrow-minded wife. Abby.”

 


Sometimes, there are options that do not occur to us because we don’t think outside the box of our usual way of thinking, and this is just as true in regard to our spiritual life as to anything else in life. For all that we here this morning know about 4G cell-phones, i-pads and all sorts of other electronic gadgets, maybe we are still not quite as over-all smart as we think we are. For all of the Orthodox theological words and terms that we have memorized, for all of the spiritual concepts with which we are familiar, maybe we are just a bit more ignorant about our discipleship to Jesus Christ than we think. For example, how do we view our discipleship to Jesus Christ: Is it a privilege, or is it just an obligation? Whichever way we think about it will determine the character of our discipleship. When it comes to our discipleship, are we begrudging misers, or are we extravagant like Mary in this morning’s Gospel reading who pours expensive spikenard upon Jesus? This morning’s feast celebrates the giving of extravagant gifts. The welcome given to Jesus as he entered Jerusalem was extravagance bordering on near riot. Mary’s unfettered anointing of Jesus with expensive spikenard was an extravagance which ignored all cost. And yet… the same people who so enthusiastically welcomed Jesus this morning will be the ones, on Friday, who will so enthusiastically nail him to the Cross. It makes you wonder what their enthusiasm really meant!

 


As we prepare to enter the Holy Week of the Passion, let us ask ourselves what our following of Jesus into Jerusalem this morning really means to us. How do we view our discipleship to Jesus Christ: Is it extravagance well-spent, or a thankless waste of time as well as a Sunday inconvenience that keeps us from fishing? In our following of Christ, do we sacrifice and give generously of ourselves, as did the widow with her meager mite who gave the totality of what little she had, or do we only give the minimum required of us by the Church? Is there a chance that we are actually spiritual minimalists, spiritual misers? Do we come to the Sunday Divine Liturgy only because we “have to”? Such an approach to discipleship to Jesus Christ would be hard-pressed to be called “extravagant”. So the question that this morning’s celebration asks of us, is: Are we miserly Christians, or extravagant Christians?

 


When Lucinda’s youngest sister Trixie came over to visit Lucinda said, "I hear you broke off your engagement to Brad? Why?" Fluffing up her hair Trixie replied, "It's just that my feelings towards him aren't the same anymore." Lucinda asked, “So, are you returning the ring to him?" Looking at her sister as if Lucinda might be dangerously insane Trixie replied, "No way! My feelings towards the ring haven't changed a bit!" 

 


Like Trixie, we are sometimes so sure that what we are doing is correct, at least until the outcome informs us otherwise! This is also true of our discipleship to Jesus Christ. This coming Holy Friday should give us pause to ask: “What kind of a disciple are we: An extravagant disciple, or a miserly one? Would we have stayed by the Cross, or would we, too, have scurried away? When push comes to shove… what kind of a disciple are we… really?” This morning’s feast of exuberance which will turn into Friday’s crucifixion should cause us to wonder: Do we, as disciples of Jesus Christ, know what we our discipleship is really about? Is not wanting to be disturbed or inconvenienced a characteristic of our discipleship? And if so: Are we really a follower of Jesus Christ who, this coming Friday, so willingly embraces the inconvenience of the Cross? To be Christ’s disciple means to think and do as he has done; if we are minimalist disciples, then what do we make of Christ’s example this coming Friday? The answer to that question depends upon how we view the requirements of our being a Christian. When it comes to our response to Christ’s invitation to “Follow me”, are we slowed-down by a miserliness of spirit? Without the extravagant self-sacrifice that being a follower of Jesus Christ requires… as is evidenced by his own example on the cross on Great Friday… then we are in danger of becoming spiritual anorexics.

 


The graduate with a Science degree asks, "Why does it work?"  The graduate with an Engineering degree asks, "How does it work?"  The graduate with an Accounting degree asks, "How much will it cost?"  The graduate with a Philosophy degree asks, "Do you want fries with that?"

 


This morning’s Gospel reading asks: Are we thankful for the self-sacrifice that this Great Lent of 2016 has demanded of us? For some of us, we might have a hard time equating the self-sacrifice of our discipleship to Jesus Christ with the extravagance of thankfulness for that very self-sacrifice… and yet, without thankfulness fueling our following of Christ, we will be unable to understand love’s outpouring of itself… either on this morning’s unmeasured anointing of Jesus, or on Great Friday’s afternoon on Golgotha. As we journey towards Golgotha this week, let us ask the Holy Spirit to come and enlarge our hearts and to help us to not take such a miserly approach to our discipleship, such a minimalist approach to the Church’s requirements of us, or such an antagonistic view of one another.

 

 

 

Glory to Jesus Christ!

 


Sermon given by Father James (Bohlman)

On Sunday April 2nd, 2017

At St. Mary Magdalene Church

Rincon, GA

(and for the missions in Helena, GA & Big Island, HI)

 


Heb. 9: 11-14

Mark 10: 32-45

 


In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

 


Glory to Jesus Christ!

 


Some years ago, the “Darwin Awards” were established to highlight unusual ways in which people remove themselves from humanity’s breeding pool through spectacular feats of stupidity. The following are three runners-up who made the list not because of their deaths, but because of a display of their lack of functioning brain-cells:

 


An American teenager was in the hospital recovering from serious head wounds received from an oncoming train. When asked how he received the injuries, the lad told police that he was simply trying to see how close he could get his head to a moving train before he was hit.

 

A man walked into a Louisiana convenience store, put a $20 bill on the counter, and asked for change. When the clerk opened the cash drawer, the man pulled out a gun and asked for all the cash in the register, which the clerk promptly provided. The man grabbed the proffered cash from the clerk and fled, leaving his $20 bill on the counter. The total amount of cash that he got from the drawer... was $15. The real question here is: If someone points a gun at you and gives you money, has a real crime been committed?

 

And finally: The Ann Arbor News crime column reported that a man walked into a Burger King in Ypsilanti , Michigan at 5 A.M., flashed a gun, and demanded cash. The clerk turned him down because he said he couldn't open the cash register without a food order. When the man ordered onion rings, the clerk said they weren't available for breakfast. Disgusted, the robber just walked away.

 

People can find happiness in the strangest things; for some it is the idea of easy money, for some it is the thrill of coming close to death without actually making the full commitment to it. For many of us Americans happiness seems to be the latest i-phone, the latest hot car, the latest computer program which, while supposedly making our life easier, usually requires endless hours of work to make our life easier. Isn’t it funny how we will go to any lengths to learn about new things that interest us?! But do we do the same thing in regard to our spiritual life? Things are supposed to change as we go throughout life… so why don’t we? Each year, as we pass through Great Lent, do we even bother to tackle anything at all about our spiritual life, or is the Lenten season simply another empty church ritual for us, something to simply be endured and gone through, but not changed by? Do we come out of Great Lent each year in the same spiritual condition as when we entered into it? And if so… what does this mean?

 


Just showing up in church during Great Lent doesn’t make us a repentant Christian any more than just standing in a garage makes us a car: It is not sufficient that only our bodies show up for services; our heart needs to be changed by our being here as well, a lesson that St. Mary of Egypt learned to her core. This morning, the church offers St. Mary of Egypt’s life to us to show us what repentance looks like, and what it looks like is a person who has been radically changed by some kind of insight. Has this Great Lent produced a life-changing insight for any us here this morning? If not… what does this mean?

 


Lucinda’s parents, Ludovico and Grizellda, lived in Florida. One day about a week before Easter, Grizellda called Lucinda up in New York and said, “Lucinda, I have something to tell you. I don’t really want to tell you about it, but I think I have to. I'm merely telling you because you're my oldest child, and I thought you ought to know. I've made up my mind, I'm divorcing your father."  Lucinda, in shock, asked, “Mama, what happened?!” Grizellda replied, "I don't want to get into it. My mind is made up." Lucinda countered with, “But mama, you can't just decide to divorce Papa out of the blue, not after 54 years together. What happened?" Grizelda replied, "It's too painful to talk about it. I only called because I thought you should know. I really don't want to get into it any more than this. You can call your sisters Trixie and Mrs. Nagorny, and tell them; it will spare me the pain." Lucinda said, “Where’s Papa? Let me speak with him.” Grizelda countered with, "No I don't want you to say anything to him about it. I haven't told him yet. Believe me it hasn't been easy. I've agonized over it for several days, and I've finally come to a decision. I have an appointment with the lawyer the day after tomorrow." Lucinda said, “Mama, don't do anything rash. I'm going to take the first flight down tomorrow. Promise me that you won't do anything until I get there." With a deep sigh, Grizellda replied, "Well, all right, I promise. I'll hold off seeing the lawyer until after you get here. Call your sisters and break the news to them. I just can't bear to talk about it anymore."  And Grizellda hung up.

 


A half hour later, Grizellda received calls from her daughters Trixie and Mrs. Nagorny who said that they and all of the Grand-children would be arriving in Florida the day after the next. After hanging up Grizellda called out to Ludovico in the next room, "Well Ludo, it worked for this holiday, but what are we going to do next time to get them to come home for Thanksgiving?"

 


Grizellda is not one to be put off by the complexity of a scheme that might get her what she wants. St. Mary of Egypt also did not take the easy way out. St. Mary of Egypt spent a long night in tears wondering what prevented her from passing into that church, and sometime during St. Mary’s long night of tears her heart was broken and purged, which gave birth in her to an insight about her life, an insight so powerful that it enabled her from then on to lead a life of repentance. In short: She changed! We might well be tempted to think, “But she really needed to change, she was a prostitute!” This train of thought clearly makes the point that it is so easy for us to see where others need to change, and yet to be blind to our own need for change.

 


Even the Apostles in this morning’s Gospel reading seemed to have been at least somewhat ignorant about their own hearts’ desires. In this morning’s Gospel reading, we heard the following: “Then James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to him and said, ‘Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask…Grant us that we may sit, one on your right hand and the other on your left, in your glory.’” In other words: What’s in it for us?!

 


Leroy, Fred’s next-door neighbor, wanted to determine if both his wife and his mistress were faithful to him. So he decided to surprise each of them by booking them on the same cruise and then later question each one about the other's behavior. When Mrs. Leroy returned, he asked her about the people on the trip in general, and then casually asked her about the behavior of his Secretary from work, who Mrs. Leroy knew from office visits. Replying in a low, conspiratorial, but smug voice, his wife replied, "She slept with nearly every man on the ship.” Disheartened, when he went in to the office the next day Leroy asked his cheating mistress the same questions about his wife, who the Secretary knew from the framed photo on Leroy’s desk. The Secretary replied, "She was a real lady." Pleased, but curious, Leroy asked, "How so?" The Secretary said, "She came on board with her brother and never left his side." The problem is that Leroy’s wife does not have a brother!

 


Like the apostles in this morning’s Gospel reading, we all want to be someone, to be singled out. And yet, according to Jesus Christ, the way to greatness is not by being at the top of the heap:

“Whoever desires to become great among you shall be your servant. And whoever of you desires to be first shall be slave of all. For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life as a ransom for many.”

 


In other words, Christ was telling his disciples that their take on what being a disciple meant had to change, that being his disciple was not a matter of privilege, but one of sacrifice. We Orthodox appreciate the concept of repentance, and the change that it implies… in theory. It’s when repentance starts getting specific to MY life, however, that the trouble begins and that reasons then occur to me why things should just stay the way that they are. Had that been Mary of Egypt’s mindset, she would have remained a prostitute, and we would not be commemorating her this morning. Is it possible that Jesus wants less of us than he wanted of Mary of Egypt… we who call ourselves his followers, his disciples.

 


If we are honest with ourselves we know that there are some things that we just don’t get, and the beginning of repentance for us could be admitting just that! On this last Sunday of Great Lent of 2017, through St. Mary of Egypt’s life Jesus Christ expresses a last call to us for our repentance and a change of our heart before we enter the sacred days of the Passion and the Resurrection. Let us pray, during this final week of Great Lent of 2017, that his call does not go unanswered. As we so often hear in the Divine Liturgy: “Let us attend!”

 

 

 

Glory to Jesus Christ!

 

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